The force of fired gun-powder, and the initial velocities of cannon balls
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The force of fired gun-powder, and the initial velocities of cannon balls determined by experiments; from which is also deduced the relation of the initial velocity to the weight of the shot and the quantity of powder. By Charles Hutton, ... Read at the Royal Society, Jan. 8, 1778. by Charles Hutton

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Published by printed by J. Nichols (successor to Mr. Bowyer) in London .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination38p.,plate
Number of Pages38
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20079772M

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The Force of Fired Gun-Powder, and the Initial Velocities of Cannon Balls, Determined by Experiments; From Which is Also Deduced the Relation of the Initial Velocity to the Weight of the Shot and the Quantity of Powder. By Mr. Charles Hutton, of the Military Academy at Woolwich. Communicated by Samuel Horsley, LL.D. Sec. R. S. Created Date. The force of fired gun-powder, and the initial velocities of cannon balls: determined by experiments; from which is also deduced the relation of the initial velocity to the weight of the shot and the quantity of powder. By Charles Hutton, Read at the Royal Society, . The force of fired gun-powder, and the initial velocities of cannon balls: determined by experiments ; from which is also deduced the relation of the initial velocity to the weight of the shot and the quantity of powder. By Charles Hutton Read at the Royal Society, Jan. 8, The Force of Fired Gun-Powder, and the Initial Velocities of Cannon Balls, Determined by Experiments; From Which is Also Deduced the Relation of the Initial Velocity to the Weight of the Shot and the Quantity of Powder. By Mr. Charles Hutton, of the Military Academy at Woolwich. Communicated by Samuel Horsley, LL.D. Sec. R. S. - NASA/ADS.

The force of fired gun-powder, and the initial velocities of cannon balls: determined by experiments; from which is also deduced the relation of the initial velocity to the weight of the shot and the quantity of powder. By Charles Hutton, Read at the Royal Society, Jan. 8, By 4to, from Phil. Trans., , p, 3 tables, 2 fldg plates including one of a cannon. (Preceded by 3p 'On the action of nitre upon gold & platina' by Smithson Tennant). Neatly rebound at some time in cloth, gilt lettering on spine, by Henry Sotheran. Sl browning to first page & plates, red edges. DNB: Count Rumford founded the Royal Institution in Figure (a) We analyze two-dimensional projectile motion by breaking it into two independent one-dimensional motions along the vertical and horizontal axes. (b) The horizontal motion is simple, because. and. is a constant. (c) The velocity in the vertical direction begins to decrease as the object rises. The force of fired gun-powder, and the initial velocities of cannon balls: determined by experiments; from which is also deduced the relation of the initial velocity to the weight of the shot and the quantity of powder. By Charles Hutton, Read at the.

The Force of Fired Gun-Powder, and the Initial Velocities of Cannon Balls, Determined by Experiments; From Which is Also Deduced the Relation of the Initial Velocity to the Weight of the Shot and the Quantity of Powder. By Mr. Charles Hutton, of the Military Academy at Woolwich. Communicated by Samuel Horsley, LL.D. Sec. R. S. (pp. ).   Old naval ships fired 15 kg cannon balls from a kg cannon. It was very important to stop the recoil of the cannon, since otherwise the heavy cannon would go careening across the deck of the ship. In one design, a large spring with spring constant × N/m was placed behind the cannon. The other end of the spring braced against a post that was firmly anchored to the ship's frame. The force of fired gun-powder, and the initial velocities of cannon balls: determined by experiments; from which is also deduced the relation of the initial velocity .   I'm not sure if it is the same as tossing two balls, because here, the position or range of the two objects are not the same. Also, one presumes that the initial velocity of the projectile is the same, since they came from the same ship. I've corrected my typo. Thanks. Zz. August 6, at AM.