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Published by University of Chicago Press in Chicago .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Juvenile justice, Administration of -- United States.,
  • Extenuating circumstances -- United States.,
  • Transfer of cause -- United States.,
  • Criminal courts -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Statementedited by Jeffrey Fagan and Franklin E. Zimring.
SeriesThe John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation series on mental health and development
ContributionsFagan, Jeffrey., Zimring, Franklin E.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsKF9779 .C435 2000
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 440 p. ;
Number of Pages440
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL46410M
ISBN 100226233804
LC Control Number99045190

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The Changing Borders of Juvenile Justice: Transfer of Adolescents to the Criminal Court John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation series on mental health and development Research network on adolescent development and juvenile justice. The Changing Borders of Juvenile Justice: Transfer of Adolescents to the Criminal Court (The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on. Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice) by Jeffrey Fagan, Franklin E. Zimring and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Since the s, recurring cycles of political activism over youth crime have motivated efforts to remove adolescents from the juvenile court. Periodic surges of crime – youth violence in the s, the spread of gangs in the s, and more recently, epidemic gun violence and drug-related crime – have spurred laws and policies aimed at narrowing the reach of the juvenile by: Judicial Waiver in Theory and Practice Robert O. Dawson 3. Legislative Exclusion of Offenses from Juvenile Court Jurisdiction: A History and Critique Barry C. Feld 4. Blended Sentencing in American Juvenile Courts Richard E. Redding and James C. Howell 5. Juvenile Justice on Appeal Lynda E. Frost Clausel and Richard J. Bonnie 6.

The changing borders of juvenile justice: transfer of adolescents to the criminal court / edited by Jeffrey Fagan and Franklin E. Zimring. Format Book Published Chicago: University of Chicago Press, c Description p. cm. Other contributors Fagan, Jeffrey. Zimring, Franklin E. Series. how it is changing, what its effects have been–and there have been no serious attempts to take it out of the political realm, into the realm of policy. The Changing Borders of Juvenile Justice is the first book to take a scholarly, analytical look at the phenomenon American law recognizes that children are different from adults; it acknowl-.   Network researchers examine whether the prosecution of adolescents as adults reduces crime and recitivism. Their research capitalizes on unique conditions in the New York City region, where the laws of two states, New York State and New Jersey, span the border of a single metropolitan area. On the New York side of the border, juveniles as young as 13 are charged in adult court, while on the. The Changing Borders of Juvenile Justice: Transfer of Adolescents to the Adult Criminal Court Through much of the 20th century, the juvenile court was the primary legal forum to re-spond to children who broke the criminal laws. With the rise in youth crime beginning in.

Consequences of Transfer (From The Changing Borders of Juvenile Justice: Transfer of Adolescents to the Criminal Court, P , , Jeffrey Fagan and Franklin E. Zimring, eds. -- See NCJ) Author(s): Donna Bishop; Charles Frazier: Date Published: Annotation. Blended Sentencing in American Juvenile Courts (From The Changing Borders of Juvenile Justice: Transfer of Adolescents to the Criminal Court, P , , Jeffrey Fagan and Franklin E. Zimring, eds. -- See NCJ) Author(s): Richard E. Redding; . The first juvenile court was established in Chicago, Illinois, in The modern U.S. juvenile justice system is separate from the adult criminal justice system, with a different philosophy, personnel, terminology, and organizational structure. Each state has its own system. A youth need not have committed a crime to enter the system. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Changing Borders of Juvenile Justice: Transfer of Adolescents to the Criminal Court (The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice) at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.4/5.